• Kerry Sutton

1000 days of running ~ Piotr Blazovich


This week was big, or was it? 1000 days of everyday running. Sounds big, but it really isn’t... it’s like we would celebrate 1000 days of breathing. After the initial few months to a year, running became to me like breathing. I wrote a post on this previously Running every day for a year. As mentioned in this article 20-30mins a day for a good cause it’s not too much to ask. Once you establish it as part of your daily routine (like breath - more than a daily routine), food, walking the dog, being nice to the family (still working on it) ;) it’s just there and you don’t have to think about it.

The biggest issue recently was mud and rabbit holes. I managed to turn (twist) my right foot/ankle 4 times!!!! (On separate occasions). Yes, I know... (note to self - once healed - make it stronger) while the initial pain was excruciating, after few minutes, I discovered I could continue and so I did. However ever since the last accident, I now run with an ankle brace. It gets a bit uncomfortable but provides stability and a kind of an Insurance. Will continue like that until end of Jan’21 just in case. Mixing with other sports helps to takes the pressure off too. Weekly swimming sessions and occasional cycling helps a lot.

Motivation?

It’s just a part of my daily routine. Due to the speed with which the day passes sometimes, I find night running very refreshing. An extra incentive comes from my wolf (rescued collie - whippet mix) who always needs her night walk.


Injuries?

Running with no rest (although we don’t really need rest... we are hunters/gatherers and are made for this stuff) creates some possible challenges like injuries, accidents etc. I am always hoping that despite any of the above, I will still be able to shuffle... the main thing is to listen to your body! It gives you signals. You just need to be tuned into them. As I don’t have a set distance/time in my head I try to differentiate between morning and evening runs to create the biggest rest and also change shoes and distances often. The weekly goal is 40k but if it’s 20k one week or so - no big deal it’s my journey and not someone else.


The biggest issue recently was mud and rabbit holes. I managed to turn (twist) my right foot/ankle 4 times!!!! (On separate occasions). Yes, I know... (note to self - once healed - make it stronger) while the initial pain was excruciating, after few minutes, I discovered I could continue and so I did. However ever since the last accident I now run with ankle brace. It gets a bit uncomfortable but provides stability and a kind of insurance. Will continue like that until the end of January ’21 just in case. Mixing with other sports helps to takes the pressure off too. Weekly swimming sessions and occasional cycling help a lot.

Racing?

It’s a good way to check where one is. However, one needs to be organised to join and show up. I missed a few races due to COVID and stuff and it turns out it might not have been such a bad thing. The last one was Relish half in October. Again, missed registration but I run with Damian only in opposite directions... he did Relish, I did old railways to Bristol. Both 21k and both finished within 5 mins of each other. Clocked it in at 1:34 and felt great. On top of that managed to finish greenlights - the book by Mathew Mcconaghey. A brilliant listen.


I have managed to establish another nice routine, again with Damian we do half every other Sunday morning. That keeps things ticking. We chat, we run, we drink beer (when allowed).


Are you tired?

Tiredness is a state of mind. It’s not like you can get tired of breathing... can you?! I don’t get tired. I get hungry though, and that’s the one to watch!!! This makes me angry and can be very unpleasant for the family members.

Pace:

I tend not to run to kill myself or anyone around me. So trying to be mindful and respectful not just to myself but people around. I think a side effect of frequent running is that my average pace is pretty good. I also often have a dog with me so its the usual on leash, off leash, gates, poos, the usual doggie stuff which all take some time, I also take pictures from every run check my strava profile for all beautiful views.

Here is my 1000th run & profile Strava.

I seem to be doing around 5-5:30mins per km. When I run without the dog, it goes down to 4:30/km including longer runs. My best 5k is 19mins. But it’s not about pace it’s about getting sweaty, getting busy and enjoying yourself. Here are some stats: 2021 - 2400 km run. Fastest 1k - 3:50 Slowest 1k - 8mins (dog’s poo and a chat with a fellow dog Walker ;) Longest run - 34k (70k in 2019) Avg week - 40k Highest week 78k I believe the most important thing is to enjoy it. I would love to continue for as long as I am able to do so, ideally without bionic knees/hips/heart ;) I use this time as “ me time”. I consume a huge amount of podcast & audiobooks... it’s part of my learning and growing. I have maintained the same weight (78kg and have not shrunk - still 6ft), so all is ok... Keep running! Piotr


"You only need to spend a few minutes with Kerry to feel how passionate and dedicated she is to sport and running in particular. Her ultra marathon successes are an inspiration. I’d be happy to recommend her".
Sharron Davis - MBE, Olympic Medalist

If you're keen to push your boundaries, get in touch.

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